Marlins New Ballpark Website

The Marlins have setup a website dedicated to news about the new Ballpark. They set one up in Spanish as well.

See the FAQ’s copied at end of post.
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Frequently Asked Questions

A new 37,000-seat ballpark is being planned for the Marlins and is expected to open for the 2012 season. Below are answers to
frequently asked questions about the ballpark.

Q.

Where do the Marlins play now?
A.

Since the team’s inception, the Marlins have played on a temporary baseball diamond on the football field of Dolphin Stadium located in Miami Gardens.

Q.

Why do the Marlins need a new home?
A.

A modern, destination-class ballpark is a crucial component in building and maintaining a world-class Major League Baseball team. Marlins fans have never enjoyed a home game in a facility built for their sport and surrounded by the emerging traditions of Marlins baseball. The ballpark will combine the timeless elements of ballparks beloved by fans across the country with the design and amenities essential to sports facilities of the 21st Century.

The new stadium will be designed and built for baseball – from the size, to seat locations, to sight lines and even the proximity of the field. Its playing surface will be cutting-edge and feature natural grass. In addition, the new ballpark will have a roof to protect players from rain and heat, putting an end to rain delays and unpredictable playing conditions.

Q.

How will the fans benefit from a new ballpark?
A.

Locating the ballpark in Miami will bring games closer to the fan base, making it easier for fans to attend games. It will be a true baseball ballpark, meaning fans will be able to enjoy the atmosphere and experience of a baseball game like other MLB fans throughout the nation. In addition, the ballpark will have a retractable roof to screen fans against the rain and heat.

Q.

Why is a roof so important for the fans?
A.

The frequency of rain in the south Florida summer season and the heat in the afternoons affect attendance at Dolphin Stadium. The uncertainty of weather conditions discourages South Florida’s millions of residents and visitors from building a baseball game into their plans. This potential market of visitors from other Major League cities, who would come to see their own team, combined with visitors from the Latin American nations that produce so many MLB players, strongly suggests the potential for the Marlins’ economic success if the threat of weather delays or rainouts can be eliminated. A roof means games won’t have to be cancelled due to inclement weather. When weather conditions are favorable, the roof can be retracted.

Q.

Where will the new ballpark be located?
A.

The Marlins ballpark will be built on the site of the former Orange Bowl. The use of the region’s oldest and most famous sports venue for the ballpark provides the opportunity to continue an unmatched sports legacy. The ballpark, which will occupy less than half of the 42-acre site, is less than two miles from downtown Miami.

Q.

How may seats will the new ballpark have?
A.

Plans call for a seating capacity of 37,000 that includes 3,000 club seats and 60 private suites.

Q.

How long will the Marlins lease the new ballpark?
A.

The Marlins will enter into a Non-Relocation Agreement that requires the team to operate and maintain an MLB franchise in Miami for a minimum of 35 years.

Q.

Will the new ballpark provide any major benefits to the local neighborhood?
A.

Yes, redevelopment of the Orange Bowl will create thousands of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in tax revenue, and will change the way people view and experience Miami. Major sports facilities have long been major economic drivers for the areas in which they are located, and the Marlins new ballpark will be no exception.

Q.

How has Major League Baseball supported the Marlins’ efforts to build a ballpark in Miami?
A.

The MLB named the Florida Marlins as host of a second round of the World Baseball Classic, a jewel event scheduled for March 2009 in Miami. It also pledged $3 million to build a Youth Baseball Academy for local youth to develop the sport in the region. To assist with efforts to build a “green” stadium, MLB has committed for the first time a $1 million matching grant to help the parties achieve LEED certification.

Q.

Who will pay for the new $515 million stadium?
A.

The Marlins will provide $155 million and fund any and all construction cost overruns except those that are governmentally caused. Additionally, the team will purchase from the city $100 million worth of parking spaces in the newly constructed garage and pay for all maintenance, repairs, operations and insurance on the facility.

Miami-Dade County will provide $50 million of Building Better Communities General Obligation Bond funds that were specifically allocated for the Orange Bowl site and $297 million of County tourist-tax revenues. Under Florida law, these funds are set aside exclusively for tourism-related projects. No new taxes will be levied for the project.

The city of Miami, which owns the land at the Orange Bowl site, will provide $13 million, the land and the cost of the recent demolition of the Orange Bowl.

Q.

Will parking be provided on site?
A.

The site will have parking spaces available in a parking structure to be built in conjunction with the ballpark.

Q.

What is the timeline for the stadium?
A.

The target completion date for the ballpark is the 2012 baseball season.
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About Jorge Costales

- Cuban Exile [veni] - Raised in Miami [vidi] - American Citizen [vici]
This entry was posted in Marlins Ballpark & Finances. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Marlins New Ballpark Website

  1. Eric Toms says:

    How’s the Marlins’ financing coming along?

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